A selection of smoothing gifs










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These Racy French Postcards Were Once Illegal In America











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On this day in history 17th June 1885

Statue of Liberty arrives in New York Harbor

On this day in 1885, the dismantled State of Liberty, a gift of friendship from the people of France to the people of America, arrives in New York Harbor after being shipped across the Atlantic Ocean in 350 individual pieces packed in more than 200 cases. The copper and iron statue, which was reassembled and dedicated the following year in a ceremony presided over by U.S. President Grover Cleveland, became known around the world as an enduring symbol of freedom and democracy.Intended to commemorate the American Revolution and a century of friendship between the U.S. and France, the statue was designed by French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi (who modeled it after his own mother), with assistance from engineer Gustave Eiffel, who later developed the iconic tower in Paris bearing his name. The statue was initially scheduled to be finished by 1876, the 100th anniversary of America’s Declaration of Independence; however, fundraising efforts, which included auctions, a lottery and boxing matches, took longer than anticipated, both in Europe and the U.S., where the statue’s pedestal was to be financed and constructed. The statue alone cost the French an estimated $250,000 (more than $5.5 million in today’s money).Finally completed in Paris in the summer of 1884, the statue, a robed female figure with an uplifted arm holding a torch, reached its new home on Bedloe’s Island in New York Harbor (between New York City and Hudson County, New Jersey) on June 17, 1885. After being reassembled, the 450,000-pound statue was officially dedicated on October 28, 1886, by President Cleveland, who said, “We will not forget that Liberty has here made her home; nor shall her chosen altar be neglected.” Standing more than 305 feet from the foundation of its pedestal to the top of its torch, the statue, dubbed “Liberty Enlightening the World” by Bartholdi, was taller than any structure in New York City at the time. The statue was originally copper-colored, but over the years it underwent a natural color-change process called patination that produced its current greenish-blue hue.

In 1892, Ellis Island, located near Bedloe’s Island (which in 1956 was renamed Liberty Island), opened as America’s chief immigration station, and for the next 62 years Lady Liberty, as the statue is nicknamed, stood watch over the more than 12 million immigrants who sailed into New York Harbor. In 1903, a plaque inscribed with a sonnet titled “The New Colossus” by American poet Emma Lazarus, written 20 years earlier for a pedestal fundraiser, was placed on an interior wall of the pedestal. Lazarus’ now-famous words, which include “Give me your tired, your poor/Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,” became symbolic of America’s vision of itself as a land of opportunity for immigrants.

Some 60 years after President Calvin Coolidge designated the statue a national monument in 1924, it underwent a multi-million-dollar restoration (which included a new torch and gold leaf-covered flame) and was rededicated by President Ronald Reagan on July 4, 1986, in a lavish celebration. Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the statue was closed; its base, pedestal and observation deck re-opened in 2004, while its crown re-opened to the public on July 4, 2009. (For safety reasons, the torch has been closed to visitors since 1916, after an incident called the Black Tom explosions in which munitions-laden barges and railroad cars on the Jersey City, New Jersey, waterfront were blown up by German agents, causing damage to the nearby statue.)

Today, the Statue of Liberty is one of America’s most famous landmarks. Over the years, it has been the site of political rallies and protests (from suffragettes to anti-war activists), has been featured in numerous movies and countless photographs, and has received millions of visitors from around the globe.

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Thought for the day

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Sexy pic for the day

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Sometimes the law is actually more dangerous than the people that break it.

Alien and Sedition Acts: Passed by Congress and signed into law by President John Adams in 1798, this Federalist law granted him power to detain and deport any immigrant he deemed harmful to the United States government. Given the number of deportations and restrictions of immigrant rights, it seems like he thought just about every immigrant was a “threat.”

Executive Order 9066: During World War II, President Roosevelt took it upon himself to imprison over 120,000 Japanese Americans on the west coast under the assumption that these citizens posed a threat. Their numbers included men, women, and children. The order ruined thousand of lives, and many were killed.

Public Law 503: This law was added to the legislation that granted President Roosevelt authority to hold the 120,000 Japanese Americans in WWII. It stated that anyone resisting policies and procedures in internment camps could be imprisoned. This meant that these people lost their homes, businesses, properties, and savings by the end of the war.

Espionage Act of 1917: This law was passed in WWI to prevent interference with military recruitment and operations. The act is, on most accounts, a glaring infringement upon our freedom of speech. It led to the imprisonment of many American socialist thinkers in that era, and unfortunately, it’s still used on whistleblowers today.

edition Act of 1918: The Espionage Act was replaced by this set of laws…and as it turns out, these were even worse. It led to even more restrictions of speech. Any opinion that cast the government or the war effort in a negative light, or interfered with the sale of government bonds, was punishable by law. Those who used “disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive language” about the government, flag, or military were punished with up to 20 years in prison. It was repealed in 1920.

Gulf of Tonkin Resolution: On August 7, 1964, Congress granted President Johnson the power to use military force in Southeast Asia, effectively giving him carte blanche to wage war with North Vietnam.

Indian Removal Act: After President Andrew Jackson signed the act, which allowed Native Americans to be forcibly removed from their lands, entire populations were marched west. Thousands died of hunger, exposure, and disease in one of America’s darkest hours.

Fugitive Slave Act of 1850: Enacted in 1850, the law required that fugitive slaves from the southern states be returned if captured in the north. Incredibly unpopular, it galvanized the north’s opinion on slavery. This added to the tension that would spark the Civil War.

The Patriot Act: Allowing for indefinite imprisonment of immigrants suspected of terrorism, and massive privacy violations documented under the PRISM program, the controversial law passed in the wake of 9/11 was recently replaced with the USA Freedom Act, which claims to have outlawed the mass surveillance and backdoor data collection for which the Patriot Act was infamous.

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Erotic pic dump


















































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Uma and Adriana for Metart
















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Meet The Wild And Rowdy Class Of 1911









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Funny Sexy Weird Art


























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Times When People Blindly Missed All the Sex Signs






















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Bikini smaller than sunglasses













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Are You In Good Enough Shape To Pass The Belly Button Challenge?

The belly button challenge is the newest craze that’s taking the Internet by storm. The challenge is to see if you can touch your belly button by putting your arm around your back. If you can touch your belly button with your arm around your back it means you have a good figure, but if you can’t, it means you need to lose some weight. Can you pass the challenge?









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On this day in history 16th June 1884

First roller coaster in America opens

On this day in 1884, the first roller coaster in America opens at Coney Island, in Brooklyn, New York. Known as a switchback railway, it was the brainchild of LaMarcus Thompson, traveled approximately six miles per hour and cost a nickel to ride. The new entertainment was an instant success and by the turn of the century there were hundreds of roller coasters around the country.

Coney Island, a name believed to have come from the Dutch Konijn Eilandt, or Rabbit Island, is a tract of land along the Atlantic Ocean discovered by explorer Henry Hudson in 1609. The first hotel opened at Coney Island in 1829 and by the post-Civil War years, the area was an established resort with theaters, restaurants and a race track. Between 1897 and 1904, three amusement parks sprang up at Coney Island–Dreamland, Luna Park and Steeplechase. By the 1920s, Coney Island was reachable by subway and summer crowds of a million people a day flocked there for rides, games, sideshows, the beach and the two-and-a-half-mile boardwalk, completed in 1923.

The hot dog is said to have been invented at Coney Island in 1867 by Charles Feltman. In 1916, a nickel hot dog stand called Nathan’s was opened by a former Feltman employee and went on to become a Coney Island institution and international franchise. Today, Nathan’s is famous not only for its hot dogs but its hot dog-eating contest, held each Fourth of July in Coney Island. In 2006, Takeru Kobayashi set a new record when he ate 53.75 hot dogs with buns in 12 minutes.

Roller coasters and amusement parks experienced a decline during the Great Depression and World War II, when Americans had less cash to spend on entertainment. Finally, in 1955, the opening of Disneyland in Anaheim, California, signaled the advent of the modern theme park and a rebirth of the roller coaster. Disneyland’s success sparked a wave of new parks and coasters. By the 1970s, parks were competing to create the most thrilling rides. In 2005, Six Flags Great Adventure in Jackson, New Jersey, introduced the Kingda Ka roller coaster, the world’s tallest (at 456 feet) and fastest (at 128 mph).

By the mid-1960s, the major amusement parks at Coney Island had shut down and the area acquired a seedy image. Nevertheless, Coney Island remains a tourist attraction and home to the Cyclone, a wooden coaster that made its debut there in 1927. Capable of speeds of 60 mph and with an 85-foot drop, the Cyclone is one of the country’s oldest coasters in operation today. Though a real-estate developer recently announced the building of a new $1.5 billion year-round resort at Coney Island that will include a 4,000-foot-long roller coaster, an indoor water park and a multi-level carousel, the Cyclone’s owners have said they plan to keep the historic coaster open for business.

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Thought for the day

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Infographic for the day

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