On this day in history 23rd May 1934

On this day in 1934, notorious criminals Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow are shot to death by Texas and Louisiana state police while driving a stolen car near Sailes, Louisiana.

Bonnie Parker met the charismatic Clyde Barrow in Texas when she was 19 years old and her husband (she married when she was 16) was serving time in jail for murder. Shortly after they met, Barrow was imprisoned for robbery. Parker visited him every day, and smuggled a gun into prison to help him escape, but he was soon caught in Ohio and sent back to jail. When Barrow was paroled in 1932, he immediately hooked up with Parker, and the couple began a life of crime together.

After they stole a car and committed several robberies, Parker was caught by police and sent to jail for two months. Released in mid-1932, she rejoined Barrow. Over the next two years, the couple teamed with various accomplices to rob a string of banks and stores across five states–Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, New Mexico and Louisiana. To law enforcement agents, the Barrow Gang–including Barrow’s childhood friend, Raymond Hamilton, W.D. Jones, Henry Methvin, Barrow’s brother Buck and his wife Blanche, among others–were cold-blooded criminals who didn’t hesitate to kill anyone who got in their way, especially police or sheriff’s deputies. Among the public, however, Parker and Barrow’s reputation as dangerous outlaws was mixed with a romantic view of the couple as “Robin Hood”-like folk heroes.

Their fame was increased by the fact that Bonnie was a woman–an unlikely criminal–and by the fact that the couple posed for playful photographs together, which were later found by police and released to the media. Police almost captured the famous duo twice in the spring of 1933, with surprise raids on their hideouts in Joplin and Platte City, Missouri. Buck Barrow was killed in the second raid, and Blanche was arrested, but Bonnie and Clyde escaped once again. In January 1934, they attacked the Eastham Prison Farm in Texas to help Hamilton break out of jail, shooting several guards with machine guns and killing one.

Texan prison officials hired a retired Texas police officer, Captain Frank Hamer, as a special investigator to track down Parker and Barrow. After a three-month search, Hamer traced the couple to Louisiana, where Henry Methvin’s family lived. Before dawn on May 23, Hamer and a group of Louisiana and Texas lawmen hid in the bushes along a country road outside Sailes. When Parker and Barrow appeared, the officers opened fire, killing the couple instantly in a hail of bullets.

All told, the Barrow Gang was believed responsible for the deaths of 13 people, including nine police officers. Parker and Barrow are still seen by many as romantic figures, however, especially after the success of the 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde, starring Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty.

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Listen up, Americans, here’s how to swear like a Brit

Bloody, b*llocks and bugger.

They’re all classic examples of quintessentially British swear words – and us Brits are the only nation that knows how to use them properly, delivered with a dry tone that’s somewhere between extremely annoyed and mildly indifferent.

But there’s hope for our transatlantic cousins yet, thanks to a new video that hopes to teach Americans how to swear like the best of Blighty.

Listen up, Americans, here's how to swear like a Brit

(Picture: Anglomania/YouTube)

It’s the work of YouTube star Kate Arnell, who’s known for hosting the ‘Anglophenia’ series in which she vlogs about all things British in a cut-glass English accent.

And that English accent sounds even better as Kate shouts out a series of profanities including ‘sod’ ‘bloody’ and bollocks’, in an attempt to educate our friends on the other side of the pond.

But if any Americans are reading this, then there’s one person above all others that you’ll have to convince, should you believe that you’ve got British swearing down to a tee.

It’s this lady.

Queen

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Crystal meth addict ‘gouged out his own eyes and ate them’

Crystal meth addict 'gouged out his own eyes and ate them'

Crystal meth (Picture: REX)

A man who was high on crystal meth gouged out his own eyes and ate them, an anti-drug conference has been told.

The unnamed man was said to have been high on the drug – known as ‘ice’ – at the time of the mutilation.

The shocking incident took place at the John Hunter Hospital, in Newcastle, Australia, according to Karen McNamara MP.

Ms McNamara described what had happened while speaking at a summit raising awareness about the harmful effects of crystal meth.

Karen McNamara

Member of the Australian parliament Karen McNamara (Picture: Liberal Party of Australia)

The Liberal Party MP said: ‘There is nothing at all recreational about this drug.

‘Let me tell you a story that demonstrates this … about a young boy taken into an emergency department for treatment who gouged out his own eyeballs and ate them.

‘We have to get these kinds of stories out to young people — this is not a recreational drug.’

She said she had been told about the incident by a frontline emergency services officer who had witnessed the scene.

The Central Coast Ice Summit is organised by Australia’s The Express Advocate.

A spokesperson for the hospital could not give any more details on the incident.

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Guy’s bike gets stolen, leaves angry note and gets amazing response

Guy's bike gets stolen, leaves angry note and gets amazing response
Fantastic. More of this. (Picture: imgur.com)

Passive aggressive notes seem to be the 21st century way of dealing with things which upset us.

So when this guy’s bike was ‘stolen’, he decided to put pen to paper.

He wrote: ‘To the individual who stole my bike previously here: If you have a shred of decency you will return it with a new lock and re-evaluate your life choices.’

This was secured to the post where he’d left his bike.

Then a note slapped underneath reads: ‘Hey Bozo, it’s illegal to lock your bike to a handicap pole.

‘Check with the city for your bike. They probably removed it so it would not block a wheelchair accessible van.’

Touché. And great use of the word ‘Bozo’.

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On this day in history 22nd May 1843

The first major wagon train to the northwest departs from Elm Grove, Missouri, on the Oregon Trail.Although U.S. sovereignty over the Oregon Territory was not clearly established until 1846, American fur trappers and missionary groups had been living in the region for decades. Dozens of books and lectures proclaimed Oregon’s agricultural potential, tweaking the interest of American farmers. The first overland immigrants to Oregon, intending primarily to farm, came in 1841 when a small band of 70 pioneers left Independence, Missouri. They followed a route blazed by fur traders, which took them west along the Platte River through the Rocky Mountains via the easy South Pass in Wyoming and then northwest to the Columbia River. In the years to come, pioneers came to call the route the Oregon Trail.

In 1842, a slightly larger group of 100 pioneers made the 2,000-mile journey to Oregon. The next year, however, the number of emigrants skyrocketed to 1,000. The sudden increase was a product of a severe depression in the Midwest combined with a flood of propaganda from fur traders, missionaries, and government officials extolling the virtues of the land. Farmers dissatisfied with their prospects in Ohio, Illinois, Kentucky, and Tennessee, hoped to find better lives in the supposed paradise of Oregon.

On this day in 1843, some 1,000 men, women, and children climbed aboard their wagons and steered their horses west out of the small town of Elm Grove, Missouri. The train comprised more than 100 wagons with a herd of 5,000 oxen and cattle trailing behind. Dr. Elijah White, a Presbyterian missionary who had made the trip the year before, served as guide.

The first section of the Oregon Trail ran through the relatively flat country of the Great Plains. Obstacles were few, though the river crossings could be dangerous for wagons. The danger of Indian attacks was a small but genuine risk. To be on the safe side, the pioneers drew their wagons into a circle at night to create a makeshift stockade. If they feared Indians might raid their livestock—the Plains tribes valued the horses, though generally ignored the oxen—they would drive the animals into the enclosure.

Although many neophyte pioneers believed Indians were their greatest threat, they quickly learned that they were more likely to be injured or killed by a host of more mundane causes. Obstacles included accidental discharge of firearms, falling off mules or horses, drowning in river crossings, and disease. After entering the mountains, the trail also became much more difficult, with steep ascents and descents over rocky terrain. The pioneers risked injury from overturned and runaway wagons.

Yet, as with the 1,000-person party that made the journey in 1843, the vast majority of pioneers on the trail survived to reach their destination in the fertile, well-watered land of western Oregon. The migration of 1844 was smaller than that of the previous season, but in 1845 it jumped to nearly 3,000. Thereafter, migration on the Oregon Trail was an annual event, although the practice of traveling in giant convoys of wagons gave way to many smaller bands of one or two-dozen wagons. The trail was heavily traveled until 1884, when the Union Pacific constructed a railway along the route.

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